Museum of Contemporary Art

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Erik ReeL, 1816, acrylic on paper

The exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Santa Barbara has two of the three largest works I’ve ever exhibited in California [approximately 9 x 5 feet], and a collection of my works on paper which are rarely exhibited.  The work has its own room to itself and so has the feel of a solo show inside a very strong group show.

The exhibition will be up until the end of the month, 29 March.

For a review of the show click here.

1 thought on “Museum of Contemporary Art”

  1. Reviews don’t get much better than this: “Perhaps the strongest showing of work in this exhibition comes from Erik ReeL. His flavor of abstract painting harks back to Paul Klee, Cy Twombly, and Mark Tobey; but his mark-making technique also brings to mind California’s post-surrealist Dynaton movement of the late ‘40s and early ‘50s. However, it is the surface of the six acrylic paintings on paper that demands attention. At first glance the paintings seem ultra-flat, as though produced by some sort of printed technique. However, upon extremely close inspection, innumerable layers become evident, where brushstrokes have produced microscopic valleys and canyons into which the powdery pigment bleeds from ReeL’s personal hieroglyphs. Step away from the piece, and a similarly profound macro level of depth becomes evident, as these marks float at various altitudes above a background that seems infinitely far away. These six pieces and the two large canvases that accompany them are reason enough to go to see what is in total an intriguing and thoroughly enjoyable exhibition.’ –EXCERPT FROM REVIEW
    by NATHAN VONK Tuesday, February 3, 2015

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